Waterproof Case Fogged Up? Here's What To Do.

Discussion in 'Tips, Guides and Tutorials' started by Troy, Jul 25, 2017.

  1. Troy

    Troy Administrator Staff Member

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    Waterproof Case Fogged Up? Here's What To Do.

    The waterproof case is a hermetically sealed enclosure to keep water out.
    Conversely, it also traps in moisture present in the air.
    This moisture may condense as internal components of the camera warm up, and they collect on the walls of the waterproof case. Oftentimes in places where we don't want them to be in: The lens.

    When this happens, here's what you do.
    Wipe the outsides of the waterproof case completely dry. Take the camera out and put in crumpled paper towels in the waterproof case to wipe it clean. Don't forget to wipe the display window too.
    Dispose the paper towels, and put in some fresh ones. Close the door. Leave it for a couple of minutes while you wipe the camera too. ONLY USE A LENS CLEANING CLOTH WHEN CLEANING THE LENSES.
    Put the camera back in the empty case.

    Now you have several choices should you need to go underwater with your camera.
    1. Purchase Anti-Fog Inserts online. They're reasonably cheap. They go into the sides of the camera inside the waterproof case. They will absorb any moisture trapped in the case.
    2. Use silica gel dessicants usually found in shoeboxes, or anywhere else you may find them. Use the same way as Anti-Fog strips where they fit inside the case.
    3. DIY Anti-Fog Insert: Cut up and fold paper towels. Use them the same way as above. Not as fast acting as the above 2, but works great!

    antifog and silica gel.PNG
    The ones on the left are Anti-Fog strips.
    O, and, don't touch the camera with wet hands prior to putting it inside the waterproof case. For rather obvious reasons.

    Cheers!
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2017
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  2. WildThang

    WildThang New Member

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    You can buy the antifog strips on eBay and many online stores.
    The desiccant packets can be found everywhere.
    I put mine between the door and the screen.
    Make sure it doesn't press hard on the screen by spreading the granules around inside the packet so it is evenly flat.
     
  3. Sulev Svilponis

    Sulev Svilponis Elite

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    Sometimes, during an action, it is not possible to open the case for swiping the fog away from the lens or from the inner side of the case's window. Therefore it is wise to put the camera into the case after it has been in a cool (cooler or at least equal to the temperature, where the camera will be used) dry room for a while. Avoid loading the camera into the case in the warm and moist conditions, especially, if the camera will be used in much cooler place.
     
  4. Troy

    Troy Administrator Staff Member

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    Difference in temperature and humidity forces the moisture trapped in the case to condense and collect on the inner walls, so yes, make sure your hands are dry and you are away from water or watersplashes like a swimming pool, beach, lakes, etc, for obvious reasons.
     
  5. testy

    testy New Member

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    For preparing and kind of rescue after too much foggy weather
    i use a simple bottle-kind-preserving-jar filled with silica-gel at the bottom.

    Its my kind of cheap dry-room.(the silica gel may need a refreshment for every year)

    I used it for other action-cams and its big enough for the M20 too -- like in the picture
    DSCF0044-1024x1024.jpg
     
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  6. Steve Poole

    Steve Poole New Member

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    Actually, I think it is the other way around. when you go from a cold place to a warm, humid place, things will fog up. When I am outside in the winter, and then go inside, my glasses fog up. If I go back outside, they clear right up.

    Relative to the camera, it would apply if you are in a air conditioned room and then go out into a hot humid environment.

    Thanks for your initial input though. It got the topic going.

    Axeman
     
  7. Sulev Svilponis

    Sulev Svilponis Elite

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    It is exactly as I said. If the camera is stored in a cool, dry place before it is inserted into the watertight case, then the absolute humidity of the air inside the camera is low, because cool air can hold only small amount of vapour. If you put the camera, with cool, dry air inside, into the case, then you include only small amount of water and when the case is warming up afterwards in the ambient warm temperature, then the vapour inside the case can not condendate. There might be some condensation on outer surfaces right after you bring the cold camera into warm and moist environment, but this can be easily wiped away and when the case warms up, then no fog will appear not inside, not outside the case.

    If you do the opposite, as Steve Poole suggests, then you are in trouble, because warm air can hold a lot of vapour, but when trapped into watertight case and cooled down by ambient temperature, then the air can't hold this much vapour any more and it will condensate onto internal surfaces of the case and also onto the camera lens.

    The initial problem was related with fogging INSIDE the case. Steve Pool's suggestion would make this problem even more acute
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2017

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